Five To Die by Jerry Leblanc and Ivor Davis

Five To Die

By Jerry Leblanc and Ivor Davis

I believe this was the first real book published about the Manson murders. It was originally released in 1970, and today copies of the first edition can get rather pricey. The book was highly sought after due to some rare photographs it contained. In August of 2009, an updated version of Five To Die was released and marketed as “The Book That Helped Convict Manson”

Book Description: Forty years ago, I awoke to the news that during the night one of the most brutal murder rampages in the history of California had taken place just six miles from my house. In the early hours of August 9th l969, Sharon Tate, a devastatingly beautiful, 26-year-old actress, eight and a half months pregnant with her first child, had been savagely slaughtered in a house she was renting in the Benedict Canyon area of Beverly Hills. As the world quickly learned, the victims of a night of wholesale carnage included a group of her friends: Hollywood celebrity hair stylist Jay Sebring, coffee heiress Abigail Folger and her boyfriend Voityck Frokowsky who was an old pal of Tate’s Polish, film-director husband Roman Polanski, and a young man named Steven Parent…More

Pages: 240

Publisher: Thor Publishing Company; New edition (August 7, 2009)

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Five To Die by Jerry Leblanc and Ivor Davis

  1. Fred Bloggs says:

    This is one superb book. It’s criminally underrated and it’s interesting that Vincent Bugliosi mentions it in “Helter Skelter” calling it a “quickie paperback.”
    Well, it’s a lot more than that, believe me.
    It’s something of a myth buster for a start. It busts the myth of Vince Bugliosi being the one that created the myth of Charles Manson. Vincent is barely mentioned in the book, if at all and the information given to the authors is incredible. It’s important to keep in mind that this book was written before the trial began.
    It also pieces together the Hinman murder connection in a way that is really eye opening and does so in a way that no other book I’ve come across does, all the more remarkable considering when it was written.
    Like every book on the subject, there are errors but the errors in the book are forgivable and fall more into the realm of “subsequently we have discovered more” than the kind of laziness found in more recent books and therefore inexcusable, given that we do know more than was known in early 1970.
    It’s a rare book and hard to get hold of. I was fortunate to find a copy at an astronomical price in Wood Green in London. I managed to get the price right down by making an appeal to the bookshop and they said OK because they liked my style !
    This is one of the books on the subject that you won’t regret owning and reading.

  2. ivor davis says:

    I was most impressed by Mr. Fred Bloggs (is that the very famous Fred Bloggs of England!!!) and his observations.
    My first book was written faaaast.
    The newer version: “Five to Die:The Book that Helped Convict Manson” I updated a few years ago.
    I don’t even have a copy of my original book.
    Because of the enormous response–we may bring out an E-book. Stay tuned.–ivor davis

  3. Fred Bloggs says:

    ivor davis says:

    I was most impressed by Mr. Fred Bloggs (is that the very famous Fred Bloggs of England!!!) and his observations

    Why, thank you !
    “Five to die” is however, a remarkable book, especially when we take hindsight into account and particularly when put up against the only other book on the case at the time, “The killing of Sharon Tate” which in my opinion is only borderline useful. And it stands up well against any of the books that came after the trial.

    It’s funny, I’ve never come across anyone that uses the name Fred Bloggs or anyone even with the surname ‘Bloggs’ but it seemed quite a common “John/Jane Doe” type name when I was a lad growing in the 70s.
    But I always liked “Fred Bloggs.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>