Beausoleil Denied Parole

Wednesday, July 1st, 2020

Jul. 1 – Bobby Beausoleil was found unsuitable for parole at a hearing held today by the California Board of Parole Hearings.

Beausoleil, currently housed in the California Medical Facility in Vacaville, is serving a term of 7-years-to-life, for the 1969 murder of musician Gary Hinman. He was tried twice; first in November of 1969 resulting in a hung jury. He was then tried in April of 1970, resulting in a conviction of first degree murder. He was sentenced to death on April 15, 1970. In 1972, his death sentence was commuted to life when the death penalty was briefly outlawed.

Beausoleil has now been denied parole 19 times since becoming eligible on August 4th, 1976. He was recommended for parole at his last hearing, held on January 3, 2019. On April 26, 2019, Governor Gavin Newsom reversed the decision, stating, “While Mr. Beausoleil reports to have accepted responsibility for his crime, I am troubled by his lack of insight into his underlying motives for committing such extraordinary violence. I am also concerned that Mr. Beausoleil will relapse into substance abuse if released. Given the heinous nature of this crime and Mr. Beausoleil’s limited insight into his violence and substance abuse, I do not believe he can be safely released at this time.”

Beausoleil will not be eligible for parole until 2023.

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28 Responses to Beausoleil Denied Parole

  1. louis says:

    Well…

  2. NoJusticeNoPeace says:

    Do the same with Lulu. Murdering bitch has had more representation than the Boston Tea Party.

  3. Gary says:

    Have you the transcript of his first trial Bo?

  4. KA says:

    You just made my night 😂😂 brilliant.

  5. Bobby Davidson says:

    Sorry Bobby but figured it would happen no govenor with political ambition is ever going to let you or Bruce, Leslie all.granted parole by the professional parole board members but of course the high and mighty Gavin Newsome had to show the voters how much he cares about them
    NOT look what he I’m sure he had something to do with it after 50 years at San.luis opispo they transferred him to San Quentin ain’t that sells bullshit m.facebook.buddies with your son.he has your eyes we did.online petition for Lynette two years later she was freed maybe it will work for you

  6. cielodrive.com says:

    Gary, this this the complete trial. People V Beausoleil 1969

  7. CybeleMoon says:

    Not surprised.The way many of the Manson group, lived their lives ( esp Beausoleil), thumbing their noses and without concern for the rest of society, with thievery and murder, degrading and torturing their victims without a thought for laws, morality or rules and now he want to be released back into the law abiding society he held in such contempt. Is he a sociopath or is he reformed? I wonder what his psychological report says. It boggles the mind. Even looking at both sides I think life in prison isn’t unjust at all. At any rate in this case I think it is just.

  8. No comprende says:

    what?!?

  9. Fred Bloggs says:

    CybeleMoon says:

    and now he wants to be released back into the law abiding society he held in such contempt. Is he a sociopath or is he reformed?

    I don’t think he’s either.
    I don’t think he’s a sociopath and I don’t think he is particularly reformed. Although he committed murder 51 years ago, I don’t even think he’s dangerous. I’ve long felt that Bobby’s problem is this; he thinks, even now, that he’s somehow smarter than everyone else. It’s almost like he hasn’t cottoned onto the fact that his invisibility cloak stopped working back in early August ’69 and that people see through him.
    He might well have been telling the truth but if you really assess his tales, he’s mixed stories up and sometimes with such subtle degrees that after half a century, he’s become kind of un-believable, ie one can’t believe what he says.
    Bobby reminds me of those sharks that even if the blood they smell is their own, they’ll turn on and eat themselves !

  10. Trish says:

    Agree, he needs to stay right where he is at. Agree @Fred Boggs he does seem to have been that way as you stated. Also, he’s smart enough to know, he will probably die there. @No justice,No peace, also right. I use to think that maybe Pat might be sorry, but now I don’t think so; they should not come put of prison unless in a pine box. Leslie was given more special treatment than any of them and she ASKED to go, knowing there would be killings AND wiped everything down thoroughly in the house for prints……still dangerous?? Absolutely!!!

  11. Cybele Moon says:

    Agreed to all above, though sociopaths do have large egos. Anyone who is capable of torturing someone who was apparently a friend, for three days before killing them then, is what? I wouldn’t ever feel he could be trusted.

  12. Fred Bloggs says:

    Cybele Moon says:

    sociopaths do have large egos

    So do popular musicians, politicians, actors, sports people, some rich folk, pimps, business owners……………

    Anyone who is capable of torturing someone who was apparently a friend, for three days before killing them then, is what? I wouldn’t ever feel he could be trusted

    People have often ragged on me for making this point but have never grappled with the answer, namely, what about a soldier in a war or even someone administering torture on a terrorist suspect ~ would you ever trust that person again, knowing what they are capable of and have done ? The issue is not whether they are under orders or whether or not one can compare the context of war to the context of greed and murder ~ I get all that. The issue is what one human being is prepared to do and what they do actually do.
    The argument works about parole as well ~ there are people who do atrocious things in war or in the name of security and then when they have left the service never do anything akin to those actions again ~ and wouldn’t deign to do such things again, demonstrating that people can change in quite profound ways or can walk away from such actions and continue with their lives.
    The reason Bobby has always posed a risk is not because he killed a man in 1969 but because he has always played fast, loose and slippery since the moment of his arrest back in ’69, changing stories, giving information that he clearly does not know to be right and engaging in an attitude that quite frankly does not give those with responsibility any confidence that he has actually moved far away from the mindset of the man that did commit murder. It’s not that there is a fear he’ll kill again. It’s that there is little confidence that even in his 70s, rather like Charlie Manson and other criminals he will tread an even path because he doesn’t come over well as a man that learns his lessons well.
    As an aside, that doesn’t apply to Leslie or Pat, which is not to say that they should automatically be paroled, just that their changes have long been in a totally different league to that of Bobby.

  13. Cybele Moon says:

    Fred, in this case I don’t understand your response as “devil’s advocate ” and your cavalier response about “so do artists and pimps” is not the same thing either. There are sociopaths among us who do not murder, and then are those who “without conscience” do. I just happen to think Beausoleil may be one of those. As you later state he does not give those with responsibility any confidence that he has actually moved far away from the mindset”. Isn’t that what I was more or less saying? War is a completely different scenario with a completely different psychological aspect unless you want to say that the Manson family was at war with the rest of society? What humans do in the stress and trauma of war (and are still held responsible for in certain cases) is not exactly like walking into a friend’s house on an afternoon and torturing and murdering them over money.

  14. Mari says:

    You know what I find interesting about these comments, they’re usually made by the same group of people. Just curious , is this group the same people that control this site? Don’t get me wrong this CieloDrive site is fantastic. The amount of information about what happened in ’69 is amazing but why aren’t there more differing opinions? I don’t expect that these questions will be answered , because who the heck am I , it’s an obseverartion that’s all. Maybe consider publishing different opinions to make it more interesting like the content that is posted to your site.

  15. Cybele Moon says:

    Ha ha Mari, we are just an opinionated bunch who like to keep the conversation going.
    Thanks to those who run this site it has been a marvelous information record and interesting forum with topics covering morality, psychology, society, legality, the American justice system, – all stemming from events that took place 50 years ago during that summer of peace and love and Woodstock.

  16. Fred Bloggs says:

    Mari says:

    You know what I find interesting about these comments, they’re usually made by the same group of people. Just curious , is this group the same people that control this site? Don’t get me wrong this CieloDrive site is fantastic. The amount of information about what happened in ’69 is amazing but why aren’t there more differing opinions?

    Like Cybele says, some of us are just opinionated and this happens to be a subject that we are interested in. Personally, I have an interest in a wide variety of subjects. And you can’t blame those of us that do comment on a regular basis for the fact that many choose not to. That’s like saying to a group that go to Spain every year “you come here every year. Why don’t some different people come here !” Ask the ones that don’t come, not the ones that do !!

  17. Fred Bloggs says:

    Mari says:
    I don’t expect that these questions will be answered , because who the heck am I , it’s an observation that’s all

    Come to think of it, why don’t you comment ? You must have looked at sufficiently plenty threads to know who has commented when and how much ?

    Cybele Moon says:

    in this case I don’t understand your response as “devil’s advocate ” and your cavalier response about “so do artists and pimps” is not the same thing either

    I was being flippant but to raise a serious point. Ego alone doesn’t point to sociopathy. Sure many do have large egos but as I pointed out, so do lots of people that wouldn’t be regarded as sociopaths. Personally, I don’t believe Bobby is a sociopath. That would, in my opinion, be giving him a get out card.
    Come to think of it, when we use terms like socio and psychopath, we’re not usually saying that it’s their fault. So how should one approach the subject ?

    As for the war point, I’ve never said that it’s the same and yes, the Manson clan were in a war situation ~ as far as they were concerned and let’s be honest, the establishment to some extent had more or less declared a cultural war of sorts {both sides had}. None of that justifies murder but we can’t really have this conversation without viewing things from the viewpoint of the participants, even if one doesn’t agree with their viewpoint.
    I’m not afraid to look at their viewpoint and try to understand it. That doesn’t mean I agree with it.
    My point however is regarding the mindset one must house in order to deliberately kill another human being, whether you are a crook or a soldier or an executioner or a lawmaker. It’s a big deal, it’s not some small thing, at least not the first time or first few times. That plays into whether a person can change from having killed. I think a person can. Many are of the opinion that no, if you’ve murdered that’s it, it can never leave you. I’m not under any illusions that everyone that has murdered is a reformed character just because they’ve been in prison. But some are and the journey they’ve had to take is at least comparable to that that anyone who has killed in war and had to get away from that has had to take.
    Interestingly, I think Bobby regrets killing but his mindset and actions over a very long time have not made a good case for him being someone that wouldn’t fall into criminal activity again. Let’s face it, many re-offend but don’t initially want to.

  18. Michael says:

    Mari, thanks for making me chuckle. But no, I have neither the brains nor the patience to run a blog site. I really do appreciate you folks who run it, though, whoever you are. Many of us will always have a deep interest in this case, and we all appreciate the chance to converse with each other about it. After all, there aren’t that many parties you can go to and say, “So what’s your take on Leslie Van Houten’s parole?” At least not in my circles.

    Among the Manson killers still in prison, Bobby has always seemed the least remorseful to me. A few years back, he had the gall to tell a panel that he now understood what Gary Hinman felt like when Bobby stabbed him, because Bobby himself had recently been stabbed by a fellow prisoner.

    The blindness of that comment was staggering. That fellow prisoner did not have Bobby restrained and helpless as Hinman had been, the stab wounds Bobby inflicted were fatal while the one inflicted on him was clearly not, and he was not terrorized for days while pleading for his life. That he could so callously compare his suffering to Gary’s left me more opposed than ever to his parole.

    I know this puts me out on a limb, but I do see likable qualities in Pat and Leslie, while still being against their release. But every time I’ve heard Bobby interviewed or questioned in parole hearings, I’ve seen nothing close to empathy or sorrow, and the guy just leaves me cold.

  19. Cybele Moon says:

    Fair enough Fred, and Michael I totally agree about Beausoleil.

  20. Christy says:

    Some years ago I read a couple of articles about older people in prison. The first profiled four people. Two men and two women. Of the four only one had committed their crime when young, one of the women. All four had either been convicted of murder or in one case attempted murder for hire. The other three ranged in age from 55 to 70 at the times of their crimes.

    The second article was about the oldest person on California’s death row. He was in his 90s. When he was about mid 70s he shot and killed a clerk in a pawn shop during a robbery. A career criminal and convicted felon he still managed to get a gun. More than likely he was thought to be harmless due to his age when he was paroled from his last stay in prison.

    Thing is, especially now, with many people out of work due to covid I’m not sure how any of the remaining family members can support themselves.

  21. Fred Bloggs says:

    Well, having read the transcript of the hearing, Donna Lebowitz had Bobby stitched up well and good like a tight pair of underpants that can’t be taken off when one is desperate for a crap. It’s painful reading.

  22. Sid says:

    For those of you who say Bobby is so smart, why did he leave the murder weapon and bloody clothes in Gary Hinman’s stolen car in which he was caught sleeping on the side of the road? With that being said I think he should have been paroled by now. The only reason he is still in is because of his affiliation w/ Manson

  23. Lee says:

    Where to begin….First of all, it’s almost embarrassing to read the transcript, because this man truly, wholeheartedly thinks of himself as some sort of celebrity rock musician who has “fans”, instead of what he really is: a plain ol convict! This thing he does by distancing himself from the Manson Family is ludicrous as well. He fathered children with two of those bird brains that were sitting on the corner of Broadway & Temple with shaved heads & holding their stupid finger up in a one symbol. He’d probably get more favor if he’d just come clean, but he’s going to stick to the drug burn story, and continue to smear his victim, instead of being a man and admitting he was sent there, along with Manson’s two dogs to rob Gary of any money he might’ve had. He’s a smug jerk!

  24. Lee says:

    Where to begin….First of all, it’s almost embarrassing to read the transcript, because this man truly, wholeheartedly thinks of himself as some sort of celebrity rock musician who has “fans”, instead of what he really is: a plain ol convict! This thing he does by distancing himself from the Manson Family is ludicrous as well. He fathered children with two of those bird brains that were sitting on the corner of Broadway & Temple with shaved heads & holding their stupid finger up in a one symbol. He’d probably get more favor if he’d just come clean, but he’s going to stick to the drug burn story, and continue to smear his victim, instead of being a man and admitting he was sent there, along with Manson’s two dogs to rob Gary of any money he might’ve had. He’s a smug jerk!

  25. Fred Bloggs says:

    Sid says:
    For those of you who say Bobby is so smart, why did he leave the murder weapon and bloody clothes in Gary Hinman’s stolen car in which he was caught sleeping on the side of the road?

    It does seem, on first hearing about it, like a daft thing to do, for sure. The irony is, however, that the clothes with blood spatter on them never went towards convicting him. There wasn’t enough to determine who the blood belonged to, it was such a tiny amount. It was a similar story with the knife. In the first trial, the blood specialist Francis Turney said there was no blood on the knife. The coroner, David Katsuyama, found no blood. One of the cops, Paul Whitley {well, he was Whitley then ~ a couple of years later in a different trial, he identified and spelled his name as Whiteley !} said he found it in a tyre well so arguably, Bobby had hidden it in a place that few would have ever thought to look for it. I’m not saying he was smart, just logical. Apparently, he really liked the knife and didn’t want to chuck it. And it was never formally identified as the murder weapon in that first trial. Whitley testified that he didn’t see anything in the car that appeared to be blood {although he saw some spots on the knife that he thought might be blood} but that they told Bobby that the knife they’d found had blood on it. It’s a tactic the police are allowed to do {ie, deceive} if they have reasonable suspicion and the courts won’t throw it out as long as the tactic doesn’t result in someone making a false confession. And Bobby admitted the knife was his and that he’d hidden it there because he’d been stopped by an officer in Santa Barbara for carrying the knife and didn’t want any further trouble.

    Lee says:
    This thing he does by distancing himself from the Manson Family is ludicrous as well. He fathered children with two of those

    Yeah, I agree. He spent many years claiming solidarity with the Family. At one point he was giving interviews about them, he was requesting to be housed in the same prison as Charlie Manson, he was saying they were all one, from the same family, conflating his plight with theirs etc……
    Does he not realize that the printed word lives on ? That people only have to read things he said in the 70s and 80s, even on this site, to be able to conclude that his involvement is way deeper than he has tried to claim over the last few years ?

    Two interesting things about him fathering children. Firstly, he actually had three women {Gail in Frisco and Sandy Good & Kitty Lutesinger in the Family} pregnant at the same time. And the child that was born to Gail was born on the same day he murdered Gary Hinman. Susan Atkins is purported to have said to Virginia Graham that during the death of Sharon Tate she thought to herself “to taste death and yet give life !” {when she tasted some blood she’d noticed on her hand}. But in reality, that phrase applied to Bobby more than anyone else in this case.

  26. Lee says:

    Fred/grimtraveller, you sure love the copying/pasting feature, huh?

  27. Fred Bloggs says:

    It’s a good tool. Saves me having to write out a heck of a lot of previous quotes.

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